My friend, cherryshampoo/Pahoua, took the photos for my post today!
Some awkwardness this way~

My friend, cherryshampoo/Pahoua, took the photos for my post today!

Some awkwardness this way~

(Source: angiechuwho)

aprettycatastrophe:

Black and yellow. 

This is one of my favorite outfits ever. It used to be the only “dress up” outfit I had in the days before I started routinely buying things other than band tee shirts and skinny jeans. 

Dress and cardigan are both thrifted, shoes are Seychelle wedges from a few seasons ago. Probably my favorite pair of shoes I’ve ever owned. The sunglasses are vintage thrifted and the necklace is Thelma Pickles, my little deer. 

This dress has apparently gotten shorter with each wash but I’m getting a lot better about showing my knees. 

theclotheshorse:

new outfit post is up. click-through for more pictures. details:cardigan ℅ ModclothShop Ruche topthrifted skirt (similar)Modcloth tightsSeychelles oxfordsZara purseJORD watch

theclotheshorse:

new outfit post is up. click-through for more pictures. details:
cardigan ℅ Modcloth
Shop Ruche top
thrifted skirt (similar)
Modcloth tights
Seychelles oxfords
Zara purse
JORD watch


Wearing my new modcloth sunglasses!
Start of spring~

Wearing my new modcloth sunglasses!

Start of spring~

(Source: angiechuwho)

pianicolas:

Worn #1
Thrifted gray dress (only Php35!!) paired with boots from a department store and a silver necklace for a no-brainer outfit when I’m running late

beautifuldynamite:

steinbrenners:

I HAVE NEVER RELATED TO SOMETHING SO MUCH

I don’t have a “thing” for height, but there’s just something about real tall dudes that makes me happy.

tall lanky ass men who look like they’re going to topple over in the middle when they stand up

(Source: carlosbeltrans, via magnacarterholygrail)

People don’t really give a shit that angels are being douchebags, but they’re not so keen on Satan being relatable.

lolmythesis:

Religious Studies, University of Aberdeen

"It’s just a couple of angels having a slap-fight. Perception of religious themes in Supernatural.”

Finalized thesis can now be found here: tinyurl.com/plqayoh

Friend: So how do you think you've changed since high school?
Me: Well I became aware of oppressive power structures and how we are complicit in them and now seek to dismantle them.
Friend: ...
Me: I also think I got hotter.

And do you ever wonder why republicans are only concerned with folks in the “inner cities” AKA black folks? Why no mention of poor folks in rural places in states like West Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee? Could it be because these poor white people vote republican and you need them (and others) to view those inner city people as being bad? Why demean one group of poor people and give the other group of poor people a pass? Is it because one group of poor people should be blamed for their condition but the other should not? Why cut food stamps and other programs that you think will help poor folks in the inner cities, but throw all kind of farm subsidies to rural poor folks?

jammerlammie:

male “intellectuals” in their early to mid 20s who feel strongly about absolutely nothing but will argue about serious issues like misogyny and racism just to add another “I Win” notch on their belt of arguments are the most pretentious,vapid,soulless pieces of shit i have ever seen.

literally just trying to hide the fact that they have no real opinions or thoughts of their own but hey at least they’re good at demonstrating their phony intelligence and staying oh so calm and ‘objective’ during debates

(Source: fancynewbeesly, via curvellas)

Angels and Ghosts

crunkfeministcollective:

Every day I walk or drive through historic Black neighborhoods in Atlanta, Georgia where upwards of 50% of residential properties are vacant, abandoned and sometimes burned down (but not demolished).  I see empty buildings that used to be schools, recreation centers, community centers, and businesses.  I see extraordinary flooding each time it rains; rushing water nearly covers the street.  Sidewalks are non-existent or so torn-up you cannot walk on them so folks move through the middle of the street–parents with strollers and people in wheelchairs.

On weekdays I see elementary, middle, and high school age youth sitting on porches at 11 in the morning. I see groups of black men walking away from the county jail on my way to work or standing around at all times of the day and night.  I see elders waiting at bus stops with no benches or shelters.  I see stray dogs. I see people struggling with disabilities, addictions and other ailments.   I see people waiting in line at food distribution sites. AND I see residents choosing to stay, choosing to see each other, and fighting to amplify the culture of these historic communities.  I also see neighborhood  people working to serve the needs of those in their community.  I see Angels.

IMG_0600

I also see poverty with a backdrop of downtown wealth and power and I constantly have to remind myself that “smart people” designed predatory lending, mortgage fraud programs, and strategies to suppress wages and downsize entire industries.  The “college-educated” working for corporate law firms, elite colleges and universities, and top consulting firms developed models to privatize the public sector and underfund public schools, public transit, public hospitals, public services, public safety, prisons and more.  “Our best and brightest” dreamed up revitalization programs promising better, safer housing and then leveled affordable housing, displaced entire communities of color and triggered the rash of school closings we are still dealing with currently.  But these brilliant people are absent in poor communities and so rarely held to account.  They are simply Ghosts.

So I’m new to Beyonce, in that I’m nearly forty and this is the first time I’ve purchased one of her albums.  Just like she is starting to look into feminism I’m starting to look into her lyrics, visual presence, and platform.  I think her new visual album is groundbreaking and two videos in particular stick with me as I think about how poverty, power, and action are represented in media.  As an academic my platform does not compare to Beyonce’s so I think it’s significant that she seems to be inviting her followers to focus their attention on her process.  She is asking that her fans process with her.

In the “No Angel” video…

1) She is…putting her body in places that matter to make them more visible (like First Lady Obama did during President Obama’s first term).  “No Angel” opens with the sun rising on the Houston skyline.  It quickly cuts to a black community where the built structures are in the background such that the substandard housing, deserted lots and vacant properties inform but don’t define the people in the video.

2) She is…making the familiar strange- telling the world that she sees what’s happening in her hometown Houston. “No Angel” is significant because it defies typical representations of black working class and underemployed communities by foregrounding real people as subjects.  Not just dancing, partying, pouring out liquor subjects, but daytime subjects with kids, families, and interests.  It’s not about a glorification or a judgment project.

3) She is…situating the people at the center of the narrative with a gender-conscious analysis.  She is calling upon us to name the unnamed.  You see glimpses of the backstage space of women’s nighttime work and the remnants of violence in the scars and wounds on young black males’ bodies.  The many representations of memorials invoke a heavy feeling forcing me to recognize that parents who bury their children have no name.  They are not widows or orphans.  Nameless and uncategorized because naming suggests normalcy.  She spotlights these subjects, she makes them visible to us, and invites us to process with her.

In the second video, “Ghosts,” Beyonce simply asks how come?

4)  She is…signaling a move towards using her global platform to make global connections and to ask critical questions.  Questioning record labels.  Questioning why people are working “9 to 5 just to stay alive, 9-5 just to stay alive, 9-to-5 just to stay alive, how come?”

5)  She is…raising resistance and action as an option by resisting traditional channels for releasing an unanticipated album or simply contributing an essay, “Gender Equality is a Myth,” in The Shriver Report.

Beyonce is asking “how come,” and so am I.  When the images of poverty are present, but the responsible parties are absent from the frame I want to know how come?  Admittedly, I am in a nascent stage and she seems to be as well, but I appreciate that she is creating points of entry for her fans to question issues that matter to me.  That she is representing on a much larger platform what I’m seeing everywhere everyday…Angels and Ghosts

allgoodevenwhenitfeelsstrange:

preeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeach.

(Source: stevenmeiselfie, via nadiaaboulhosn)

wordswindow:

socialismartnature:

Ray Jasper is about to be unjustly executed under Texas’s racist Law of Parties. Take the time to read his brilliant, insightful, heart-breaking letter. It may be his last living statement. As Michelle Alexander wrote on her FB page, “If he is not worthy of life, none of us are.”

A Letter From Ray Jasper, Who Is About to Be Executed
4 March 2014 | Ray Jasper was convicted of participating in the 1998 robbery and murder of recording studio owner David Alejandro. A teenager at the time of the crime, Jasper was sentenced to death. He wrote to us once before, as part of our Letters from Death Row series. That letter was remarkable for its calmness, clarity, and insight into life as a prisoner who will never see freedom. We wrote back and invited him to share any other thoughts he might have. Today, we received the letter below. Everyone should read it.


Excerpts from Ray Jasper’s Letter:
“Under the 13th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution all prisoners in America are considered slaves. We look at slavery like its a thing of the past, but you can go to any penitentiary in this nation and you will see slavery. That was the reason for the protests by prisoners in Georgia in 2010. They said they were tired of being treated like slaves. People need to know that when they sit on trial juries and sentence people to prison time that they are sentencing them to slavery….
“I’m on death row and yet I didn’t commit the act of murder. I was convicted under the law of parties. When people read about the case, they assume I killed the victim, but the facts are undisputed that I did not kill the victim. The one who killed him plead guilty to capital murder for a life sentence. He admitted to the murder and has never denied it. Under the Texas law of parties, they say it doesn’t matter whether I killed the victim or not, I’m criminally responsible for someone else’s conduct. But I was the only one given the death penalty….
“I understand that it’s not popular to talk about race issues these days, but I speak on the subject of race because I hold a burden in my heart for all the young blacks who are locked up or who see the street life as the only means to make something of themselves. When I walked into prison at 19 years old, I said to myself ‘Damn, I have never seen so many black dudes in my life’. I mean, it looked like I went to Africa. I couldn’t believe it. The lyrics of 2Pac echoed in my head, ‘The penitentiary is packed/ and its filled with blacks’….
"It’s really an epidemic, the number of blacks locked up in this country. That’s why I look, not only at my own situation, but why all of us young blacks are in prison. I’ve come to see, it’s largely due to an indentity crisis. We don t know our history. We don’t know how to really indentify with white people. We are really of a different culture, but by being slaves, we lost ourselves….
"Black history shouldn’t be a month, it should be a course, an elective taught year around. I guarantee black kids would take that course if it was available to them. How many black kids would change their outlook if they knew that they were only considered 3/5’s of a human being according to the U.S Constitution? That black people were considered part animal in this country. They don’t know that. When you learn that, you carry yourself with a different level of dignity for all we’ve overcome….
"Before Martin Luther King was killed he drafted a bill called ‘The Bill for the Disadvantaged’. It was for blacks and poor whites. King understood that in order to have a successful life, you have to decrease the odds of failure. You have to change the playing field. I’m not saying there’s no personal responsibility for success, that goes without saying, but there’s also a corporate responsibility. As the saying goes, when you see someone who has failed, you see someone who was failed….
"I’m a father. My daughter was six weeks old when I got locked up and now she’s 15 in high school. Despite the circumstances, I’ve tryed to be the best father in the world. But I knew that her course in life is largely determine by what I teach her. It’s the same with any young person, their course is determined by what we are teaching them. In the words of Aristotle, ‘All improvement in society begins with the education of the young’…."

wordswindow:

socialismartnature:

Ray Jasper is about to be unjustly executed under Texas’s racist Law of Parties. Take the time to read his brilliant, insightful, heart-breaking letter. It may be his last living statement. As Michelle Alexander wrote on her FB page, “If he is not worthy of life, none of us are.”

A Letter From Ray Jasper, Who Is About to Be Executed

4 March 2014 | Ray Jasper was convicted of participating in the 1998 robbery and murder of recording studio owner David Alejandro. A teenager at the time of the crime, Jasper was sentenced to death. He wrote to us once before, as part of our Letters from Death Row series. That letter was remarkable for its calmness, clarity, and insight into life as a prisoner who will never see freedom. We wrote back and invited him to share any other thoughts he might have. Today, we received the letter below. Everyone should read it.

Excerpts from Ray Jasper’s Letter:

Under the 13th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution all prisoners in America are considered slaves. We look at slavery like its a thing of the past, but you can go to any penitentiary in this nation and you will see slavery. That was the reason for the protests by prisoners in Georgia in 2010. They said they were tired of being treated like slaves. People need to know that when they sit on trial juries and sentence people to prison time that they are sentencing them to slavery….

I’m on death row and yet I didn’t commit the act of murder. I was convicted under the law of parties. When people read about the case, they assume I killed the victim, but the facts are undisputed that I did not kill the victim. The one who killed him plead guilty to capital murder for a life sentence. He admitted to the murder and has never denied it. Under the Texas law of parties, they say it doesn’t matter whether I killed the victim or not, I’m criminally responsible for someone else’s conduct. But I was the only one given the death penalty….

I understand that it’s not popular to talk about race issues these days, but I speak on the subject of race because I hold a burden in my heart for all the young blacks who are locked up or who see the street life as the only means to make something of themselves. When I walked into prison at 19 years old, I said to myself ‘Damn, I have never seen so many black dudes in my life’. I mean, it looked like I went to Africa. I couldn’t believe it. The lyrics of 2Pac echoed in my head, ‘The penitentiary is packed/ and its filled with blacks’….

"It’s really an epidemic, the number of blacks locked up in this country. That’s why I look, not only at my own situation, but why all of us young blacks are in prison. I’ve come to see, it’s largely due to an indentity crisis. We don t know our history. We don’t know how to really indentify with white people. We are really of a different culture, but by being slaves, we lost ourselves….

"Black history shouldn’t be a month, it should be a course, an elective taught year around. I guarantee black kids would take that course if it was available to them. How many black kids would change their outlook if they knew that they were only considered 3/5’s of a human being according to the U.S Constitution? That black people were considered part animal in this country. They don’t know that. When you learn that, you carry yourself with a different level of dignity for all we’ve overcome….

"Before Martin Luther King was killed he drafted a bill called ‘The Bill for the Disadvantaged’. It was for blacks and poor whites. King understood that in order to have a successful life, you have to decrease the odds of failure. You have to change the playing field. I’m not saying there’s no personal responsibility for success, that goes without saying, but there’s also a corporate responsibility. As the saying goes, when you see someone who has failed, you see someone who was failed….

"I’m a father. My daughter was six weeks old when I got locked up and now she’s 15 in high school. Despite the circumstances, I’ve tryed to be the best father in the world. But I knew that her course in life is largely determine by what I teach her. It’s the same with any young person, their course is determined by what we are teaching them. In the words of Aristotle, ‘All improvement in society begins with the education of the young’…."

(via mycurlsareteenytiny)